Using Delivery Confirmation as Compelling Evidence

Sydney VaccaroChargeback ResponsesLeave a Comment

Using Delivery Confirmation as Compelling Evidence
A common type of dispute merchants receive is when a customer claims a product was not received. That’s where delivery confirmation is necessary evidence for merchants responding to a dispute.

Merchants need to be prepared for possible disputes with a detailed and effective prevention and response strategy. With the many different types of disputes merchants can experience, this isn’t always the easiest thing to do. Some strategies, however, are relatively easy to implement. Delivery confirmation is one of them.

A common type of dispute merchants receive is when a customer claims a product was not received. That’s where delivery confirmation can be extremely helpful for merchants responding to a dispute. If delivery confirmation is not part of your overall strategy, it’s time to start looking into it.

What is Delivery Confirmation?

The basic idea behind delivery confirmation is to inform the merchant when a product has been delivered to the customer. That seems pretty simple on the surface, but it can go much further than that. A simple delivery confirmation merely states that an item arrived. More detailed confirmations can give more information about the journey of the product from the moment it is sent. That information can include things like where it was sent from, when it arrives, and what method of delivery was used. Let’s take a moment to look at the different types of delivery confirmation and how they can help you in a chargeback dispute.

Basic Delivery Confirmation

This is delivery confirmation in its most basic form. All this does is give you confirmation that the item was delivered at the address indicated by the customer. There’s nothing with this method that makes sure the person receiving the item is the actual customer who bought it.

While basic delivery confirmation only has the most basic of protections, it’s worth noting that simply having some type of protection is often enough to deter some acts of fraud.

Tracking

This method provides a more detailed look at the whole delivery process from the moment the product first ships to its arrival at the intended destination. Every time the package gets scanned, that information can be sent to the merchant and the customer. Each party can keep close track of every step of the item’s journey.

This is helpful since the merchant will know when the item arrives, while the customer can receive peace of mind from being able to track the package the whole time. This can also help reduce instances of chargebacks that customers file due to impatience rather than an actual failure to receive the item. But like basic delivery confirmation delivery tracking only lets you know that the product has arrived. It doesn’t indicate with certainty that the cardholder directly received the item.

Signature Confirmation

This method involves the recipient actually signing for the package once it’s delivered. In the event that the recipient wasn’t present at time of delivery, they will be informed to go pick it up at a carrier location or wait for another delivery day. With the signature confirmation strategy, there are a few different types. For example, you could choose to require Adult Signature Confirmation, where the signee much be over the age of 21. Or you could go with Direct Signature Required, where a person at the delivery address will need to sign for the item.

Signature confirmation, whether in-person or digitally, gives merchants the proof that the cardholder signed for the product. It can also act as added fraud protection for the customer in case the signature doesn’t match their own.

Direct Delivery Only

Another method is Direct Delivery Only, which is provided by UPS. With Direct Delivery Only, the item can’t go to any other address without the merchant’s permission. In other words, the package can’t be rerouted or sent to an alternative location by anyone except the merchant. Think of this method as an added layer of protection which prevents a prospective criminal from redirecting a package. One other thing to note is that this method doesn’t require the recipient’s signature. That’s an added service you need to specify.

Responding to Disputes With Delivery Confirmation

In any dispute response, you want the evidence to support your side of the argument. Delivery confirmation can provide that evidence. While confirmation of delivery won’t help in all dispute scenarios, the one where it can prove most useful is for the “merchandise not received” chargeback.

There are plenty of reasons a customer might not receive a product. Whenever you’re hit with a “merchandise not received” chargeback, delivery confirmation can protect you, proving that the cardholder got the product they ordered. Without delivery confirmation, it will be your word against the cardholder, and chances are the bank will side with the cardholder.

The more involved the confirmation, the more evidence you’ll have on your side. For example, if you have basic delivery confirmation combined with signature confirmation, you’ll have even more proof that the cardholder received the item. With that evidence, you’ll be able to dispute a chargeback from a strong position.

Delivery confirmation can be a smart decision, particularly for expensive products. If consistently applied, it can act as a significant and effective strategy for preventing disputes in the first place. And in cases where disputes are still filed, you can respond with confidence.

Merchants need to be prepared for possible disputes with a detailed and effective prevention and response strategy. With the many different types of disputes merchants can experience, this isn’t always the easiest thing to do. Some strategies, however, are relatively easy to implement. Delivery confirmation is one of them.

A common type of dispute merchants receive is when a customer claims a product was not received. That’s where delivery confirmation can be extremely helpful for merchants responding to a dispute. If delivery confirmation is not part of your overall strategy, it’s time to start looking into it.

What is Delivery Confirmation?

The basic idea behind delivery confirmation is to inform the merchant when a product has been delivered to the customer. That seems pretty simple on the surface, but it can go much further than that. A simple delivery confirmation merely states that an item arrived. More detailed confirmations can give more information about the journey of the product from the moment it is sent. That information can include things like where it was sent from, when it arrives, and what method of delivery was used. Let’s take a moment to look at the different types of delivery confirmation and how they can help you in a chargeback dispute.

Basic Delivery Confirmation

This is delivery confirmation in its most basic form. All this does is give you confirmation that the item was delivered at the address indicated by the customer. There’s nothing with this method that makes sure the person receiving the item is the actual customer who bought it.

While basic delivery confirmation only has the most basic of protections, it’s worth noting that simply having some type of protection is often enough to deter some acts of fraud.

Tracking

This method provides a more detailed look at the whole delivery process from the moment the product first ships to its arrival at the intended destination. Every time the package gets scanned, that information can be sent to the merchant and the customer. Each party can keep close track of every step of the item’s journey.

This is helpful since the merchant will know when the item arrives, while the customer can receive peace of mind from being able to track the package the whole time. This can also help reduce instances of chargebacks that customers file due to impatience rather than an actual failure to receive the item. But like basic delivery confirmation delivery tracking only lets you know that the product has arrived. It doesn’t indicate with certainty that the cardholder directly received the item.

Signature Confirmation

This method involves the recipient actually signing for the package once it’s delivered. In the event that the recipient wasn’t present at time of delivery, they will be informed to go pick it up at a carrier location or wait for another delivery day. With the signature confirmation strategy, there are a few different types. For example, you could choose to require Adult Signature Confirmation, where the signee much be over the age of 21. Or you could go with Direct Signature Required, where a person at the delivery address will need to sign for the item.

Signature confirmation, whether in-person or digitally, gives merchants the proof that the cardholder signed for the product. It can also act as added fraud protection for the customer in case the signature doesn’t match their own.

Direct Delivery Only

Another method is Direct Delivery Only, which is provided by UPS. With Direct Delivery Only, the item can’t go to any other address without the merchant’s permission. In other words, the package can’t be rerouted or sent to an alternative location by anyone except the merchant. Think of this method as an added layer of protection which prevents a prospective criminal from redirecting a package. One other thing to note is that this method doesn’t require the recipient’s signature. That’s an added service you need to specify.

Responding to Disputes With Delivery Confirmation

In any dispute response, you want the evidence to support your side of the argument. Delivery confirmation can provide that evidence. While confirmation of delivery won’t help in all dispute scenarios, the one where it can prove most useful is for the “merchandise not received” chargeback.

There are plenty of reasons a customer might not receive a product. Whenever you’re hit with a “merchandise not received” chargeback, delivery confirmation can protect you, proving that the cardholder got the product they ordered. Without delivery confirmation, it will be your word against the cardholder, and chances are the bank will side with the cardholder.

The more involved the confirmation, the more evidence you’ll have on your side. For example, if you have basic delivery confirmation combined with signature confirmation, you’ll have even more proof that the cardholder received the item. With that evidence, you’ll be able to dispute a chargeback from a strong position.

Delivery confirmation can be a smart decision, particularly for expensive products. If consistently applied, it can act as a significant and effective strategy for preventing disputes in the first place. And in cases where disputes are still filed, you can respond with confidence.

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