Usage Evidence Gathering Strategies

Sydney VaccaroChargeback ResponsesLeave a Comment

Usage Evidence Gathering Strategies
Strategies on how to find and provide usage evidence for a dispute response.

To make a winning dispute response merchants must provide evidence that disproves the cardholder’s claim. The evidence that merchants must provide is laid out by the card networks. To make the most compelling response documents it is recommended that merchants follow the card networks guidelines as close as possible. One piece of compelling evidence that the card networks ask merchants to provide in their responses is usage evidence. We will go over some strategies on how to find and provide this evidence.

What is Usage Evidence?

Usage evidence is when you prove that a customer is using the product or services that they purchased. This evidence comes in handy when the cardholder is claiming that they never received the product, that the transaction was fraudulent, that they canceled the subscription, among others. When providing usage evidence the overall goal is to prove that the customer has possession of or has access to your product or service, with as much detail and context as you can provide. It may be necessary to include several items of evidence to make your case. Here are some ways to show usage evidence:

Logs of Customer Usage

This piece of evidence is great for service or digital good merchants. You can provide any evidence that shows the cardholder usage. This can range from showing the cardholder logging into an app to stream music or checking in at the front desk of the gym. It is helpful to provide all the information you can around the logs to give the dispute analyst the full picture.

Communications

Provide any communications your company had with the cardholder discussing the product or service. This could be a support email, chat or a phone call that shows the customer is in possession of the product or service.

Social Media

Social media posts can be used as evidence. You can provide a social media post of the cardholder that shows the products from the order pictured or displaying works created using your product or service. This could be as simple as finding a picture of them in the shoes they purchased then disputed. Make sure you explain and give content to the social media evidence given. Don’t just assume that the analyst will know that the person in the photo is the cardholder wearing the disputed merchandise.

Listings

Show that the product has been listed for sale by the cardholder through links to or screenshots from eBay or Craigslist. It is important to prove that it is the cardholder or the exact product disputed that is in the listing.

Providing usage evidence can require a little more digging and investigative work than providing other evidence for the response like AVS. But finding and providing these evidence could be the last checkmark needed to win the dispute and recover revenue.

Putting Together Your Response

When putting this evidence together, keep in mind that a real person will be reviewing the dispute response. A dispute analyst will go through your response document and decide if the merchant or cardholder will retain the money from the transaction. With this in mind, you will want to make sure you are painting a complete and clear picture for them. Put yourself in their shoes and see if your evidence makes sense to someone looking at your product or seeing your business for the first time.

To make a winning dispute response merchants must provide evidence that disproves the cardholder’s claim. The evidence that merchants must provide is laid out by the card networks. To make the most compelling response documents it is recommended that merchants follow the card networks guidelines as close as possible. One piece of compelling evidence that the card networks ask merchants to provide in their responses is usage evidence. We will go over some strategies on how to find and provide this evidence.

What is Usage Evidence?

Usage evidence is when you prove that a customer is using the product or services that they purchased. This evidence comes in handy when the cardholder is claiming that they never received the product, that the transaction was fraudulent, that they canceled the subscription, among others. When providing usage evidence the overall goal is to prove that the customer has possession of or has access to your product or service, with as much detail and context as you can provide. It may be necessary to include several items of evidence to make your case. Here are some ways to show usage evidence:

Logs of Customer Usage

This piece of evidence is great for service or digital good merchants. You can provide any evidence that shows the cardholder usage. This can range from showing the cardholder logging into an app to stream music or checking in at the front desk of the gym. It is helpful to provide all the information you can around the logs to give the dispute analyst the full picture.

Communications

Provide any communications your company had with the cardholder discussing the product or service. This could be a support email, chat or a phone call that shows the customer is in possession of the product or service.

Social Media

Social media posts can be used as evidence. You can provide a social media post of the cardholder that shows the products from the order pictured or displaying works created using your product or service. This could be as simple as finding a picture of them in the shoes they purchased then disputed. Make sure you explain and give content to the social media evidence given. Don’t just assume that the analyst will know that the person in the photo is the cardholder wearing the disputed merchandise.

Listings

Show that the product has been listed for sale by the cardholder through links to or screenshots from eBay or Craigslist. It is important to prove that it is the cardholder or the exact product disputed that is in the listing.

Providing usage evidence can require a little more digging and investigative work than providing other evidence for the response like AVS. But finding and providing these evidence could be the last checkmark needed to win the dispute and recover revenue.

Putting Together Your Response

When putting this evidence together, keep in mind that a real person will be reviewing the dispute response. A dispute analyst will go through your response document and decide if the merchant or cardholder will retain the money from the transaction. With this in mind, you will want to make sure you are painting a complete and clear picture for them. Put yourself in their shoes and see if your evidence makes sense to someone looking at your product or seeing your business for the first time.